Resources for the Surgery Shelf

High Yield Topics The single highest yield topic for the surgery shelf is easily GI; it comprises anywhere from 25 to 30% of the exam. Pulmonary and cardiology topics are the next highest yield topics. The lowest yield topics are immunology, dermatology, and obstetrics. Roughly half of the exam is diagnosis; almost one-third is management,…

Resources for the Family Medicine Shelf

High Yield Topics Half of the family medicine shelf is management and health maintenance, at ~30% and ~20%, respectively. Pathophysiology is less than 10% of the family medicine shelf, and establishing a diagnosis is about one-third of the exam. The highest yield topics are cardiology, pulmonary, and GI. Relatively low yield topics include immunology, hematology, obstetrics…

Applying for Residency, Part One

Yesterday marked the first day programs can download applicant information from ERAS, the Electronic Residency Application Service.  As I am applying to residency (or for residency, or however the hell one should phrase it) this year, this will likely be the first in a series on “shit I discovered through the process of applying to…

Resources for painlessly staying up to date on medical literature

There are always new papers coming out in medicine, but ain’t nobody got time to read all of that. Here are a few resources for painlessly staying up to date on the medical literature, in order to derive the greatest amount of information from the least amount of reading, impress your attendings, and piss off…

The Final Stretch

As the third year of medical school is swiftly coming to a close, the year is hardly winding down. The list of things I need to accomplish in the coming weeks is only growing in its length and intensity. And as the tedium and misery of life in medical school is coming to a fever…

Resources for the Medicine Shelf

High Yield Topics The highest yield topics for the medicine shelf are cardiology and pulmonary. Together, they make up anywhere from 30 to 40% of the exam. Other high yield topics include renal and GI. Gynecology is relatively low yield for the medicine shelf. Diagnosis is less than 50% of the exam, management and pathophysiology…

Resources for the OB/Gyn Shelf

High Yield Topics As expected, half of the exam is obstetrics and half of the exam is gynecology. Diagnosis is about one-third of the exam; mechanisms are about a third of the exam; a quarter of the exam is management, and health maintenance is up to 20% of the exam. High Yield Resources 1. UWorld 2….

Resources for the Psychiatry Shelf

Keep in mind that anywhere from 10 to 20% of the psychiatry shelf is actually neurology. About two-thirds of the exam is establishing the diagnosis; management constitutes about one-fifth of the exam. Pathophysiology is little more than 10% of the exam, which makes sense considering how little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying psychiatric conditions.

The Problem with Concierge Medicine

If you’re unfamiliar with concierge medicine, it’s a bit like a gym membership, insofar as patients pay an annual fee to their private physician. In return, the physician will provide more tailored healthcare services, and assume a smaller population of patients. In this regard, patients will have exclusive access to their private physician, with whom they…

Be better.

Among the challenges of the third year of medical school, are the multiple burdens in the absence of any actual responsibility. We must manage to be sycophantic, saccharine standardized students capable of regurgitating medical data on demand for anywhere from 8 to 12 hours daily, followed by hours of studying, drilling aforesaid data into the soft tissue…

Resources for the Pediatrics Shelf

High Yield Topics The highest yield topics for the Pediatrics Shelf are cardiology, GI, pulmonary, and renal. The lowest yield topics are psychiatry and dermatology. A little under half of the exam is diagnosis, and a little under a third of the exam are mechanism questions dealing with underlying pathophysiology. Management is little more than 10%…

Music to Study and Work By

For some, the quiet can be deafening. In such circumstances, it is preferable to have music or some form of background noise to study, work, or write by. Having ambient noise helps keep my ADHD brain better engaged, promoting productivity, focus, and concentration. It is important, however, to choose sounds that are not too distracting, so as not to…